Sleep Apnea Symptoms Solutions 7 Commonly Asked Questions About Laser Eye Surgery Aspirin Sensitivity The Basic Truth What Is Refractive Eye Surgery

Apnea, in terms of the Greek word, is defined as “without breath.” This is exactly what happens to individuals who suffer from sleep apnea, which is a serious medical condition that causes the sufferer to completely stop breathing on more than one occasion throughout the night.

While it may be difficult to realize the symptoms of sleep apnea because they occur during sleep, it is possible if you know what to watch for.

For instance, you may notice uncommon exhaustion throughout the day, a general feeling of fatigue, frequent or long-lasting headaches or irritability. These symptoms occur due to lack of sleep, which is caused by sleep apnea. In addition, if your spouse notices intense snoring or long pauses between breaths at night, you may be suffering from sleep apnea.

The only person who can positively identify sleep apnea is a licensed physician. He or she may ask a series of question or, in some instances, recommend a sleep study by asking you to spend the night in a supervised sleep center. At this type of facility, the purpose is to determine whether or not you suffer from sleep apnea. A series of monitoring devices will be placed on your body in order to detect your breathing patterns throughout the night.

Sleep apnea, when left untreated, can be extremely dangerous. In fact, it can lead to heart disease, a stroke or other major health problems. In addition to the obvious health risks, sleep apnea may lessen your immune system’s ability to fight disease or the loss of sleep can cause you to be impaired when driving. Sleep apnea treatments may include sleeping on your side instead of your back, giving up alcohol and cigarettes, ridding your home of allergens, maintaining a healthy diet and exercise program or the use of a doctor recommended at-home apnea treatment.

A product known as the Sleep Genie, which is a doctor recommended anti-snoring device, is available to help provide comfort to those with sleep apnea. Manufactured of a comfortable nylon lycra blend, the Sleep Genie comfortably supports the jaw while keeping the mouth closed to prevent snoring. While the Sleep Genie is not intended as a cure for sleep apnea, many users find additional comfort when using this product with the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine, which provides continuous air pressure to help prevent the collapse of tissue in the throat that often blocks air passages during sleep. Users of the CPAP machine need to sleep with their mouth closed in order to prevent the air from escaping, which is where the Sleep Genie often proves beneficial.

This article is intended for informational purposes only. It should not be used as, or in place of, professional medical advice. Before beginning any treatment for snoring, please consult a doctor for a proper diagnosis and remedy.

Lasik and other forms of laser eye surgery have become so common and effective that many health plans around the country may soon begin paying for them as acceptable forms of eye surgery. And if they don’t, they should. The success rate with lasik eye surgery and laser eye surgery, in general, has made the procedure a household name, and made it also more affordable, so many more people can actually consider the procedure.

But no matter how many people have lasik eye surgery or laser eye surgery, you may still have your reservations. After all, they are slicing into your eyes, two of the most important organs you have, with a white-hot laser. So don’t be afraid to ask any questions that you may have, and do as much research as necessary to make yourself comfortable with the procedure. Hopefully, we can get a jumpstart for you here with this article – and the answers to the 7 most commonly asked questions about laser eye surgery.

#1: What exactly is laser eye surgery? Lasik is one form of laser eye surgery, whose sole job is to make you not dependent on your glasses or contacts anymore. Lasik stands for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis.

#2: How does lasik work to correct vision? You sure you want to know the answer to this one? Kidding aside, laser eye surgery works because it actually changes the shape of your cornea, or the clear lens of your eye that allows light to enter your eye. Doctors use a microkeratome, a knife, to create a flap in your cornea. This is then folded back and a laser, called an excimer laser, is used to “shave” off the cornea until it’s the proper shape. Of course, there are other types of laser eye surgery out there, some of which you may have already heard about, like intralase surgery.

#3: How do I know if lasik is right for me? There are a lot of considerations to make before you get the laser eye surgery. First, you have to ask yourself whether or not you can afford the procedure, or whether or not your work and health insurance will pick it up.

#4: Are there other medical conditions that could interfere with the surgery? Yes, you should be aware of any medications that you may be taking that can slow down your healing, such as steroids. You should make sure you don’t suffer from a condition that could slow your healing, such as an autoimmune condition.

#5: Are all eyes able to be “shaved”? No, some eyes, especially those with other conditions, such as dry eye, thin corneas, or pupil disorders, do not make good candidates for laser eye surgery. If your prescription is still in flux – if you’ve changed prescriptions in the last year or two – you should probably hold off on the lasik eye surgery as well.

#6: Does laser eye surgery work 100 percent of the time? No, sometimes the results are not permanent. In that case, repeated procedures may be needed down the road. You could also suffer side effects such as dry eyes, contrast sensitivity, or even blindness.

#7: How do I find a doctor? Ask around your friends, family, colleagues, and other doctors. The best laser eye surgery doctors should be experienced, have the latest equipment, be able to explain everything about the procedure to your heart’s content, and offer care down the road.

Contrary to what your folks usually think, and from what you may have heard while growing up, aspirin sensitivity is not an allergy. Though, the effects and symptoms of the case can be somehow depicting and similar to those of allergies, aspirin sensitivity is not and will never be a true allergy.

Though, aspirin sensitivity may result in adverse and similar to allergy type of reactions in affected persons.

Usually, reported cases of aspirin sensitivity are linked to those who contract moderate to almost severe form of asthma and also to chronic sinusitis.

Severity of asthma raises the susceptibility of one person to the disease. Advancing age or simply put, aging, also is a great factor that leads to aspirin sensitivity.

Take note that according to a modern study in the medicine discipline, nine out of ten, or 90%, of people who are diagnosed or described as aspirin sensitive are at the same time sensitive or manifest adverse reaction to allergy-causing drugs, foods and inhalants.

A brief history of aspirin sensitivity

Aspirin is one of the most common over-the-counter drug that is taken by people with mild fever, body aches and other mild ailments. Nowadays, aspirin tablets are also taken as a preventive drug against heart attacks or strokes.

But did you know that aspirin simultaneously originated from Egypt, Assyria and Greece. In those ancient civilizations, aspirin was in the form of a white willow bark that was then used to treat fever and pain.

The ancient Greeks, Assyrians and Egyptians also used that white willow bark, now identified as aspirin, to treat sore muscles, chills, rheumatism and headaches. The native American tribes also had the knowledge of such practices.

In 1828, salicin which was an active and stand out ingredient or chemical from the willow bark was isolated. Ten years after, in 1838, salicylic acid was first produced from hydrolysis and oxidation of salicin. In 1893, the first modern form of aspirin was produced.

The drug company Bayer secured the rights to the aspirin official trade mark and name on March 6, 1899. The rest, as they say, is a common and prolonged history.

Symptoms and Treatment

Because aspirin is so widely used today, it is somehow surprising that the drug produces sensitivity to certain people. Aspirin sensitivity almost always show up or manifest as rhinitis or what we call nasal congestion.

Aspirin sensitivity can also be mistaken for asthma or hives because the symptoms and signs of ailment are almost the same.

Through several experiments, you can determine if you are sensitive to aspirin. Take the following steps. First, take a very small dose of aspirin. Be very particular, small dose, or you might end up somewhere very unlikely if ever you are sensitive to aspirin.

After taking the small dosage, observe yourself for any sign of cough or wheezing. There will come out itchy rashes around the mouth area and watery eyes and nasal congestion is evident.

In some rare conditions, aspirin sensitivity can also cause the development of anaphylaxis or breathing difficulty, which is an allergic reaction common to bee stings. There will also be severe decline in the patient’s blood pressure.

If you are diagnosed with aspirin sensitivity, desensitization can be done under intense and monitored medical supervision. This can be funny, but such desensitization will involve taking in very little dosages of aspirin everyday until the sensitivity is gone.

If an aspirin sensitivity attack is taking place, it is best to seek immediate medical help and attention. No drugs should be taken without the doctor’s prescription or administration, because adverse reaction to other drugs can lead to fatality.

To prevent aspirin sensitivity attacks, it is advise that you avoid taking in, of course, aspirin or other anti-inflammatory medicines or NSAIDs like naproxen and ibuprofen.

Refractive eye surgery is a type of eye surgery that is used to rectify refractive errors of the eye and decrease dependency on corrective lenses such as eyeglasses and contact lenses. Successful refractive procedures can reduce myopia or nearsightedness, hyperopia or farsightedness, and astigmatism or elongated corneas. A number of different procedures exist for refractive eye surgery depending upon the type and severity of the refractive error.

There are four main types of refractive eye surgery procedures: flap and photoablation procedures; corneal incision procedures; thermal procedures; and implants. Currently, the most common refractive eye surgeries involve the use of lasers to reshape the cornea.

Flap procedures involve cutting a small flap in the cornea so that the tissue underneath can be reshaped to correct the refractive error. LASIK, short for Laser Assisted In-Situ Keratomileusis, is the most popular refractive surgery and is used to correct myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. The LASIK procedure involves using a microkeratome or IntraLase to cut a flap into the stroma, moving the flap out of the way, removing excess corneal tissue with an excimer laser, then replacing and smoothing out the flap. LASEK is best suited for individuals with thin or flat corneas. The LASEK procedure uses a small trephine blade to cut into the shallow epithelium, after which the eye is bathed in a mild alcohol solution to soften the edges of the epithelium. The flap is gently moved out of the way so that an excimer laser can remove excess corneal tissue, after which the flap is replaced and smoothed out. Epi-LASIK, like LASEK, involves a shallow cut into the epithelium, but makes use of epikeratome to create a thin epithelium sheet for removal instead of the harsher blade and alcohol.

Photoablation, the second stage in flap procedures, makes use of ultraviolet radiation to remove excess corneal tissue. PRK, or photorefractive keratectomy, was the original laser eye surgery procedure. PRK involves numbing the eye with local anesthetic eye drops, and reshaping the cornea by destroying miniscule amounts of tissue from the surface of the eye. The laser used, an excimer laser, is a computer-controlled ultraviolet beam of light. It burns cool so as not to heat up and damage the surrounding eye tissue.

Corneal incision procedures such as radial keratotomy and arcuate keratotomy use miniscule incisions in the cornea to alter its surface and correct refractive errors. Radial keratotomy, or RK, uses a diamond tipped knife to make a number of spoke-shaped incisions in the cornea. The result of the incisions is that the cornea flattens out, minimizing the effects of myopia. Arcuate keratotomy, or AK, is very similar to RK. The diamond knife is used to cut incisions that are parallel to the edge of the cornea, as opposed to the spoke-shaped incisions of the RK procedure. These procedures have been much less common with the emergence of laser-assisted refractive eye surgeries.

Thermal procedures use heat to correct temporarily hyperopic refractive errors, or farsightedness. The thermal keratoplasty procedure involves putting a ring of 8 or 16 small burns on the eye immediately surrounding the pupil. The application of the heat increases the slope of the cornea, making it steeper, through thermal contractions. There are two main types of thermal keratoplasty. Laser Thermal Keratoplasty, or LTK, is a no-touch procedure that uses a holmium laser. Conductive Keratoplasty, or CK, uses a high-frequency electric probe.

The final type of refractive eye surgery involves the use of implants. Implantable contact lenses, or ICL, can be used to correct severe levels of myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism. The implants are actually tiny contact lenses that are inserted through a small incision in the side of the cornea. Implants are seated so they sit immediately in front of the eye’s natural lens just behind the cornea. ICL works in conjunction with the eye’s natural lens to refocus light on the retina and produce a crystal clear image.

Each of these procedures has its advantages and disadvantages, and not all individuals are suitable candidates for refractive eye surgery. Individuals who are interested in learning more about surgical options should contact their ophthalmologist for more information about these procedures, as well as inquire about other new cutting-edge procedures. Since ophthalmologic surgery is constantly growing and changing with emergence of new technologies and methods, there are always new techniques in development. As new equipment is developed and methods refined that can improve the success and minimize the side effects of refractive eye surgery, new procedures will emerge to replace outdated techniques.

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