Tips On Kayak Fishing Choosing The Perfect Guide On Your Fishing Trip Best Lures To Use In Fishing How To Choose The Right Rod And Reel Humminbird Fish Finder 595c Don T Worry About Not Finding The Perfect Fishing Locations

It takes a long time to become an expert in kayak fishing. The period of apprenticeship, which must be served in order to transform the novice into a veteran kayak angler can be discouraging and often runs into years.

About the nearest thing to a short cut is to have an old-timer take the first-timer under his wing and let the novice accompany him on kayak fishing trips

Basically, kayak fishing is gradually making a name in the industry.

Its popularity is steadily creating sustainable gratifications aside from the fact that kayaks have long been used in fishing.

History has it that even in the early times; kayak fishing has long been the primary source of fish supply ranging from the “flatfish halibut” to other kinds of big fish. These activities, which happened from the mid 18th Century until the late part of it, were all noted by the Russian Orthodox priests. These turn of events are now known as “The Native History.”

From then on, kayak fishing continued to dominate the fishing industry, where once, people were doubtful if it could really aid the anglers to catch some fish. The steady feature brought about by its “sit-on” type has long been the primary characteristics of kayaks that made it an ideal fishing boat.

However, with kayak fishing, the angler has to learn how to steady the kayak as he tries to paddle through the waters, in which it is considered as part of the whole process.

Therefore, for people who wish to know some tips about kayak fishing, here’s a list that may help them enjoy this tricky activity.

1. Safety first

Like any activity, it is necessary that before an individual plunges into action, he or she must first observe some safety measures and background checks to ensure security and protection against any imminent danger.

The angler must check the weather condition, the tide, and other elements concerning kayaking.

2. Hatches should be closed at all times

The angler should always keep in mind that it is best to keep the hatches closed while fishing. Water can never seep through the kayak if the hatches are kept closed.

3. Steady fishing

When the angler is already in the midst of the waters, it is better to have an anchor to keep the kayak steady while on the verge of catching fish.

Best of all, before an individual goes out to the waters, it would be better if he let somebody know his whereabouts. In this way, somebody will be able to keep track of your activity.

As they say, safety should always come first.

“Do I really need a guide?” is usually one of the first questions asked from anglers going on their first fishing trip. It’s impossible to accurately answer that question with a “yes” or a “no”, but we can give you the information you need to know to answer the question by yourself.

Guides can be worth having as long as you know exactly what you’re getting. For example, most people don’t realize hiring a guide is no guarantee you’re going to catch a trophy fish. The guide will take you to the places known to have fish, but catching them is still up to you.

If you don’t know what you’re doing, the guide can only help you so much. However, if that’s the case, a guide may be well worth it to you. Since you will be arriving at a lake you’ve never been on before, and you only have a few days to catch fish… a guide can really be a big help. Without a guide, you could spend days just trying to find out where the fish are.

Most guides are great anglers themselves. They spend all spring and summer on the lake and know what works and what doesn’t. Here are some things to discuss with any potential guide so you can see if you want to hire him:

-The type of fish you want to catch

-Whether you’re looking to catch lots of fish, or just trophy sized fish

-Has the guide ever fished for the species you’re after?

-What technique will the guide expect you to use?

This is what you’ll typically get when you hire a guide:

-Expert advice on the best locations to fish

-Expert tips on how to best catch your fish

-A well prepared, delicious shore lunch

You must decide if the above is worth paying the price for a guide.

Not to be overlooked is another option to considered. You can hire a guide for just a day or two (be up front about this) and then use his (or her) advice on what to do the rest of your fishing trip. This will save you money and still get you that expert advice you’re looking for.

Now, if you’re going on a fly-in fishing trip to a lake that you know (from your research and talking to others) is full of fish… you probably don’t need a guide! There, I even answered your original question for you. That’s because lots of the remote lakes have so many fish that even a beginner couldn’t help catching all they want.

How much does a guide cost? You can expect to pay anywhere from $100 to $200 per day plus a tip of around $25 per person. So, it simply becomes a matter of how much help a guide can be to you, and whether you’re willing to pay for the service.

There, now you can decide if you want to hire a fishing guide. Here’s to you and fishing!

The evolution of fishing gear and accessories along with the development of the bass fishing industry brought about the development of various lures specifically used for different fish species.

There are many types or class of lures and they all depend on what type of fish works for them. Many only work for specific types but some cover a wide range of species of fish.

Below are some of the typical lures used for fishing.

Light Standard Casting Lures

For Standard casting lures, they are mostly able to attract a wide range of fish varieties from albacore, bluefish, bonita, oho and crappies. These lures are also excellent for certain species of bass fish and work best when retrieved from water at low to medium speed. They pass through water with undetectably synthetic material.

Their sizes are excellent for lightweight fish and a host of freshwater species. They range from 1/16 oz. to 3 oz.

The hand painted eye is enticing enough to allow schooling of fish. This feature allows for more chances of trapping one of the target fish in the water.

Heavy Standard Casting Lures

Heavy Standard Casting Lures are excellent for quite heavy fish specifically, walleye and bass. While the lightweight lures are used in most circumstances, it was shown that heavy counterparts provide more reliable fishing output.

Moreover, the heavy standard lures are able to catch fish than diamond and light standard casting lures.

Long Casting/Jigging Lures

Perhaps the most popular among the fishing lures are the long, tapered jigging lures. They are perhaps the most commonly used fishing lures among the fishermen in Florida, Mississippi and Louisiana.

Just recently, it was found out that the long casting lures work best for catching trout and pike. They were also found to effectively catch stripers and bluefish. They can catch tuna and walleye in a breeze!

Unlike heavy standard lures, this gear won’t produce good fish-catch output up to 180-200 ft under water but be sure to effectively match your lure color, bait and related accessories to maximize performance.

Deadly Diamond Lures

These lures are one of the smallest with sizes ranging from 1/8 to 1oz. They can seamlessly attract attention among fish and could form a school of fish in a minute!

The reason is it lies on its structural surface formation and cut. The top handle is cut like a diamond and causes the reflection of light striking on its surface. The diamond lures are best for catching bass fish varieties, crappie and stripers although they work on a small range of fish species.

Wading through the myriad of choices in fishing gear can leave you with a headache.

To begin with there are the choices between freshwater or saltwater fishing, light tackle, medium tackle, heavy tackle and even fly-fishing.

When considering saltwater you also stop to consider, am I going deepwater or am going to fish near shore. Do I need a rod suitable for boat fishing or a longer rod for the beach and pier fishing?

We obviously cannot address all of these in one article, so let’s take a favorite of mine, saltwater fishing. For the purposes of this article we will assume we are choosing near shore and bay fishing as opposed to offshore, deepwater fishing.

This author grew up on the Gulf Coast of Florida leading to a love of saltwater fishing. We have always had a number of fishing piers in the northwest Florida area where I was raised so having a boat was never a prerequisite. The main types of fishing we do in the Florida panhandle are fishing off the local piers extending into the Gulf of Mexico and wading in the local bays.

When fishing off the local piers one will need fishing gear from medium to medium heavy. Fishing in the Gulf of Mexico we usually focus on the following migrational species: Spanish Mackerel, King Mackerel, and Cobia. Cobia will require separate instruction that goes beyond the scope of this article.

Fishing for Spanish Mackerel requires a medium light to medium action rod at a minimum as the fish can reach a weight of seven or eight pounds in schools of large fish. The reel of choice should be equivalent to a Penn 4500ss or Penn 716 or better. Almost everyone chooses spinning reels for pier fishing. You want a reel that will hold at least 200 yards of 10 to 12 lb. test monofilament line and tie a steel leader of 12-14 inches to keep them from biting through the line.

When fishing for King Mackerel, you will need considerably heavier fishing gear as these are considerably larger fish. King Mackerel on the Upper Gulf Coast will average around twenty pounds but “smoker” Kings of over forty pounds are not uncommon and they can take out 200 yards of fishing line off your reel in seconds! When fishing for these monsters you want to have a medium heavy rod, seven to nine feet in length and preferably paired with a Penn 706z. We favor the Penn reels here on the coast because of their durability. The thing that is special about the 706 is that it has no bail, which makes for much quicker casting. This is crucial when you are competing with several other fishermen all around you. As with the Spanish Mackerel, you will want to tie on a steel leader, but a much heavier one for the Kings. Use a leader of a 40 lb. class or better.

This Humminbird fishfinder is a great tool for any fisherman looking to bring home a cooler full of fish every trip out. This particular model is part of the 500 series offered by Humminbird. This combo offers GPS Chartplotting and High Performance Sonar. Why is this so great? It gives you your position thanks to satellite technology. Telling you where you are, how to get to your hotspots, and how to make your way back. No need to worry about getting lost or not finding the perfect locations. Of course, you also get performance fish finding in this unit as well!

The Humminbird Fishfinder 595c is an awesome tool. It offers these features in a quick disconnect mount which means you can easily grab it and go. It also features the built in UniMap which is excellent for telling you where in the USA coastline and the inland lakes and rivers to 4nm in details. Awesome accuracy in this is also provided. These things can help you get to the hot spots and find your way back. No need to worry about getting lost or making the wrong turn when you have such a reliable map to use. Other features include a 20 degrees single beam sonar which is optimized for coverage and bottom detail. It gives you a good look at what’s below the surface so that you can navigate your boat where you need it to go.

On top of these features, you’ll find Sonar Echo Enhancement which is a great tool for getting a good idea of where your bait is headed and how it is moving. Real Time Sonar also helps capture real time pictures of the waters. This means if the fish is there and moving, you can virtually see what it is doing so that you can react in order to grab it. Why should you invest in the Humminbird Fishfinder 595c? It is quite easy to see how well equipped you will be to find your fish and lure him to you.

Bring home a full catch everytime.

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