Depression And Celiac Disease What Causes Psoriasis Chronic Scleroderma Arthritis In The Knee What To Expect Osteoporosis And The Facts Eczema What Is It What Causes It And How To Treat It

Depression is a condition which affects about 15% of the population. Women are more likely to be affected than men.

It is quite common for people who have been diagnosed as having Coeliac Disease to find themselves feeling depressed and anxious.

For many there is a link between food and a sense of control over their lives. Celiacs are faced with something over which they feel no control.

A diagnosis of celiac disease, the restriction the new diet places upon you, and a sense of isolation created because you feel you are not able to join in with everyone else can bring on symptoms of depression.

You Are What You Eat

Poor absorption of vitamins and minerals can make the celiac sufferer feel unwell, feeling depressed can be a side effect of not having the correct balance of foods which affect your mood and have a significant impact on how you are feeling emotionally. For some of you simply sticking to a strict gluten-free diet will be enough.

Find A Helping Hand

For others outside help in the form of councelling and psychological support can be very helpful.

Get Into The Drivers Seat

Taking control of your life, finding alternatives to foods you previously enjoyed and living with celiac disease rather than letting the condition rule your life are the key. See it as an opportunity to take control of your life, to eat better, fewer processed food, less junk food.

A Positive Attitude Makes All The Difference

Consider your cup – is it half full or half empty. You are on a restricted diet but at least your condition can be completely controlled without resorting to drugs or surgery. Even a shopping trip can be an adventure rather than a drudge- what new gluten-free food can you find?

A Spirit Of adventure

Discover yours! Try new things, take up new interests, meet new people.

On a personal note I have become much more adventurous since becoming a celiac – I’ll try anything once! I have extended my range of food; I can eat better and more healthily.

All of these strategies can make a huge difference to your state of mind and they are all within your grasp. Take control and get the most out of your life.

When people are diagnosed with psoriasis, it changes them physically because of the lesions that appear on the skin. But, just as importantly, it may influence how they work, play, view themselves and interact with others.

What Causes Psoriasis?

Psoriasis may be one of the oldest recorded skin conditions. It was probably first described around 35 AD. Some evidence indicates an even earlier date. Yet, until recently, little was known about psoriasis.

While scientists still do not fully know what causes psoriasis, research has significantly advanced our understanding. One important breakthrough began with the discovery that kidney-transplant recipients who had psoriasis experienced clearing when taking cyclosporine. Since cyclosporine is a potent immunosuppressive medication, this indicates that the immune system is involved.

Can Genetics Cause Psoriasis?

Family History. Some people who have a family history of psoriasis never develop this condition. Research indicates that a “trigger” is needed. Stress, skin injuries, a strep infection, certain medications, and sunburn are some of the known potential triggers. Medications that can trigger psoriasis are anti-malarial drugs, beta-blockers (medication used to treat high blood pressure and heart conditions), and lithium. Dermatologists have seen psoriasis suddenly appear after a person takes one of these medications, gets a strep infection, or experiences another trigger.

Phototherapy Treatment for Psoriasis

Phototherapy involves exposing the skin to wavelengths of ultraviolet light under medical supervision. Treatments usually take place in a doctor’s office or psoriasis clinic. However, it is possible to follow a treatment regimen at home with a unit prescribed by your doctor. The key to success with phototherapy is consistency.

Is psoriasis contagious?

No. You can’t catch psoriasis from another person or give it to someone by touching them, and you can’t spread it to other parts of your body.

For years people with psoriasis had options that were either time consuming or had difficult side effects. However the new science of biologics is offering treatments that may help people not only manage their disease but also clear psoriasis for months and sometimes years.

What is Scleroderma? – Scleroderma is a chronic disease characterized by excessive deposits of collagen. In order to better understand Scleroderma it helps if you have some understanding as to what collagen is.

What is Collagen? – Collagen is a fibrous protein that occurrsn bone, cartilage and connective tissue. It is a major structural protein that forms molecular cables to strengthen the tendons and vast, resilient sheets that support the skin and internal organs. There is no organ or tissue which does not have collagen. Collagen acts as the important support structure in tissues around which cells live and function. Elements of our body such as bones and teeth are made by adding mineral crystals to collagen.

Scleroderma directly affects the skin, and in sometimes in more severe cases, it can affect the blood vessels and internal organs of the body. The most visible scleroderma symptom is the hardening of skin and associated scarring that goes along with it. This hardened skin will normally appear reddish or scaly in appearance. Often times this will allow blood vessels to be more visible.

The most serious aspect of the disease to take into account are: The total area that is covered, and the the level of internal involvement that is taking place. These are important to consider because a patient that only has minor coverage is much less likely to have damange to internal organs and tissues as someone with larger coverage.

Almost certainly, in cases where an entire limb is affected, future use of that limb will be jeopardized. If the coverage is over the torse, the heart and lungs will be affected which is more severe, than lets say an arm. Often times, internal scarring will occur which is more complicated and cannot simply be seen by the naked eye.

Arthritis, which is a condition that affects one in three adult Americans, is one that affects the bone joints in the body. Because there is no cure, many sufferers are forced to cope with it’s painful effects. Arthritis in the knee is one of the common ailments and can make it difficult to walk, bend the leg or even sleep at night.

Many people who develop arthritis in the knee may do so because of an injury or prolonged stress on the legs. Some examples may be playing sports, being involved in an auto accident, falling, etc. If the knee or leg is injured or strained, it will become more susceptible to developing arthritis in the knee. In some cases, arthritis in the knee may also be inherited and occurs naturally through genetics.

Some of the most common symptoms of arthritis in the knee are achy leg muscles and joints, swelling and tenderness around the knee area, a crackling sound when leg is bent or moved, stiffness and difficulty in movement. These symptoms may become increasingly worse during cold weather or when rain is predicted. Weather patterns greatly affect arthritis in the knee, as well as arthritis in other parts of the body.

As the weather changes, arthritis in the knee often worsens due to the fact that affected joints are believed to develop additional nerve endings in an effort to protect the joint from more damage. In addition, sufferers who cope with arthritis in the knee are thought to be more vulnerable in the morning and/or when any movement is initiated.

If arthritis in the knee is suspected, the best way to confirm a diagnosis is through the type of testing that only a physician can provide. During a typical office visit, doctors are likely to inquire about any additional symptoms or ailments that seem to be present with arthritis in the knee. This is important in the diagnosis of whether or not the patient actually suffers from arthritis in the knee or whether another problem is present.

Although there is no cure for arthritis in the knee, there are various treatment options available for sufferers. Among them, over the counter medications, prescription-based treatments, physical therapy, pain management and even surgery in extreme cases. In addition, numerous herbal therapies have been developed to help ease pain that is caused by arthritis in the knee.

The information in this article is to be used for informational purposes only. It should not be used in place of, or in conjunction with, professional medical advice. Anyone with questions regarding arthritis in the knee must consult their physician for further information.

Osteoporosis is called the silent thief because you do not experience any symptoms, the first time you know about it is when a bone snaps unexpectedly. Osteoporosis means “porous bones” and it is a condition where the skeleton becomes very fragile and the bones break easily. Simple things can cause a bone to break, such as stepping off a curb, sneezing, being hugged or even bending down to pick something up. Breakages are mainly in the hips, spine and wrist and effects mainly women but men can have it as well.

Nowadays you can be tested to see what your bone mass is like and because of more knowledge you can delay the onset of osteoporosis with diet and exercise earlier in your life.

You might think that the skeleton does nothing else but holds you up but it is every bit as dynamic as other tissues, bone responds to the pull of muscles and gravity, repairs itself, and constantly renews itself. The skeleton also protects the internal organs, as well as allowing you to move about.

After the age of 30, the bone starts to breakdown and outpaces formation. The volume of the bone remains the same, but it’s density declines.

Calcium intake is important to build bone but you also need vitamin D to help the body absorb the calcium. Vitamin D is produced by the skin in sunlight or can be found in many foods, such as in milk products and many breakfast cereals. It has also been found that Magnesium and Vitamin K can also assist in the reduction of bone loss. Vitamin K can be found in greens, whereas Magnesium is found in small quantities in a variety of foods, so eating a varied, healthy diet should provide what you require.

A lifelong habit of weight-bearing exercise, such as walking or biking, will also help build and maintain strong bones. The greatest benefit as you grow older is that physical fitness reduces the risk of fracture, because it gives you better balance, muscle strength, and agility, making falls less likely. Exercise also provides many other life-enhancing psychological and cardiovascular benefits.

You don’t have to do too much, to get the most benefit from exercise. It is suggested that 30 minutes brisk walking five days a week is all you need. Add in a little weightlifting, and that’s even better. The reason behind this recommendation is that the flexing of bones during exercise is thought to prompt the body to lay down more calcium in the bones. It’s always smart to ask your doctor before starting a new exercise program, especially if you already have osteoporosis or other health problems.

It is important to ensure that when exercising the body has enough nutrients to build muscle otherwise minerals could be leeched from the bone making the bone more susceptible to osteoporosis. It is therefore important that you do not exercise on an empty stomach.

Osteoporosis is a problem that can affect anyone in their later years and you should do all that you can to keep your bones strong.

Eczema, also known as Dermatitis, is a condition of the skin, which can affect people of any age. The severity of the disease can vary – in mild forms the skin is hot, dry and itchy, while in more severe cases the skin can become broken, raw and bleeding. Although Eczema can sometimes look unpleasant, it is fortunately not contagious. With treatment of the affected skin area, the inflammation of eczema can be reduced, though the skin will always be sensitive and will require extra care in order to avoid and control flare-ups.

Eczema comes in various forms, and can have several causes, depending on the particular type of eczema that a person has. One type of eczema is thought to be hereditary, while other types of eczema are caused by irritants coming in contact with the skin; for example detergents. Eczema can also be caused by blood circulatory problems in the legs, with older people.

Atopic Eczema: The most common form of eczema. It can be found in both children and adults and often runs in the family. Symptoms of Atopic Eczema include unbearable itchiness, overall dryness of the skin, redness and inflammation.

Allergic Contact Dermatitis: A form of Eczema which develops when the immune system reacts against a substance in contact with the skin. Such reactions may occur when the skin is in contact with substances like nickel in earrings, belt buckles, or buttons. Some people also suffer these symptoms when wearing certain perfumes. Once a substance irritation is discovered, contact with the offending substance should be avoided.

Irritant Contact Dermatitis: This is a type of eczema caused by regular contact with everyday substances, such as detergents or chemicals which are irritating to the skin. Irritant Contact Dermatitis is best avoided by keeping the irritant away from the skin, and keeping any sensitive skin areas well moisturized.

Infantile Seborrhoeic Eczema: An eczema which commonly affects babies under one year old, also known as Cradle Cap. It often starts on the scalp or nappy area and can quickly spread, although it is neither sore nor itchy. Creams and bath oils can assist the healing process.

Adult Seborrhoeic Eczema: A form of eczema which generally affects adults between the ages of 20 and 40. Often appearing as mild dandruff, it can spread to the face, ears and chest. The skin affected turns red and inflamed, and then starts to flake. Infected areas can be treated with anti-fungal cream.

Varicose Eczema: Caused by poor circulation, Varicose Eczema often affects middle-aged to older people, causing the skin to become speckled, itchy, and inflamed. The affected areas should be treated with emollients and steroid creams before the skin breaks down, often resulting in ulcers.

Discoid Eczema: An Eczema generally found in adults. It can suddenly appear as several coin-shaped patches of red skin, normally on the trunk or lower legs. These areas become itchy and can weep fluid. Discoid eczema is usually treated with emollients, and steroid creams if necessary.

SUMMARY: Pharmacies offer a wide range of products for the treatment of Eczema, yet eczema sufferers should also look for ways of minimizing environmental allergens commonly found in the home.

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