Mount Snowdon Wales Interesting Information For Visitors Travel In Italy Free Guide Of Verona For Families Sicily Travel Guide

If you plan to visit Snowdon in Wales this summer, here is some interesting information about the mountain that you might like to know.

Snowdon, in Welsh, is Yr Wyddfa, which means tomb or monument. Legend has it that it is the tomb of Rhita Gawr, an ogre who would kill kings and make cloaks out of their beards.

He supposedly met his end when King Arthur climbed to the top of Mount Snowdon and killed him.

No one knows who first conquered Snowdon, but ascents of the mountain became popular when Thomas Pennant published ‘Tours’ in 1781 and included his visit to the summit.

Snowdon, as indeed the surrounding area, has been mined since the Bronze Age, and evidence of copper mining can be seen all over the mountain, from old mine buildings, to old tramways. Care should be taken around these old buildings.

Facts and Figures of Snowdon

Snowdon stands 1,085 metres (3,560 feet) high. Each year 350,000 people reach the summit, some on foot and some by train. The summit has 200 inches(508 cm) of rain per year, and can reach temperatures of 30 centigrade in high summer, and plummet to – 20 centigrade in the winter. Add to this winds of up to 150 mph and the temperature can feel more like – 50. The summit buildings at the top can by covered by ice and snow between November and April.

Snowdon Mountain Railway

Before the railway, ponies used to take tourists to the summit of Snowdon. Sir Richard Moon and Mr George Assheton Smith were responsible for the idea of the Snowdon Railway – Sir Moon as a way of boosting tourists using his standard gauge lines, and Mr Smith as he realised that tourist cash may compensate him from the loss of income from his declining mines.

They imported a fully working 800mm gauge mountain railway from Switzerland. The railway remains the only rack and pinion railway in the UK. It has tooted racks in the centre of the track that engage with cogs under the carriages.

The only accident on the railway occurred on the day it opened to the public in 1896. Engine #1, Ladas, derailed and plummeted down a slope. The crew jumped from the engine and survived, and the guard applied the hand brake to the carriages and brought them to a halt. Unfortunately, one of the passengers panicked and jumped from the carriage, falling onto the tracks and under the wheels. He later died from his injuries. The saga wasn’t quite over, as just as the carriages stopped, the engine following behind (Enid – still operating today) hit them from behind!

The railway was closed. Since it reopened the following year there have been no further accidents! And since that date there has never been another Engine #1 on the Snowdon Railway!

The cost of the train trip is not cheap (apart from being a good walk in itself, another reason for trying to make the summit on foot!), but is a great way for those who cannot make the climb to travel to the top. However, good weather cannot be guaranteed, and you may start the trip on a clear day, only to find yourself in cloud as you reach the top.

If you choose to take the train up Mount Snowdon, you can walk back down via the Llanberis Path. You can get some wonderful views of the trains puffing their way up and down from the path. Not all trains are steam – there are also diesel engines.

If you plan to take the train up to the top of Snowdon beware that the trains get very crowded in the summer, and it is best to arrive early or even more advisable to book in advance by ringing 0870 458 0033 at least the day before. If you don’t you may have a long wait. A board by the ticket office will tell you which is the next train with available seats. You can buy a return, or a single to the top. Single tickets for the journey down are sold on standby basis only.

Weather permitting the trains run from mid May to the end of October right to the summit, but from mid March, and a little way into November, stop at Clogwyn. Trains start running at 9am and continue until late afternoon.

Buildings on Snowdon Summit

In 1820 the first stone shelter was built at the summit by a guide named Lloyd. A copper miner, William Morris, had the idea of selling refreshments from the shelter – an idea which continues to the present day. Having walked up the mountain it is probably as welcome today, as it was to the earlier tourist, to be able to have something to eat and drink before tackling the descent.

Two hotels were opened on the summit, one called Roberts Hotel, the other the Cold Club. Both were in fierce competition with each other. There were often more visitors then beds though, and conditions were not the best. By 1898 the Snowdon Mountain Railway and Hotels Company had taken over the hotels, and started to rebuild them – the fierce conditions on the top of Mount Snowdon means that any building had a limited live. By the 1930s it was decided to replace the summit buildings with a multipurpose hotel, cafe and station. With little regard to conservation, the builders simply pushed the derelict old huts over the side of the mountain to make way for the new build (imagine the uproar today!). Sir Clough William-Ellis, the architect and designer of nearby Portmerion, designed the new building, complete with huge picture windows so visitors could best enjoy the panoramic views. Unfortunately the windows lasted only six months before they were blown in and had to be replaced with much smaller ones.

During the war years the summit buildings were used by the Ministry of Supply for experimental radio work, and subsequently by Air Ministry, Admiralty and Armed forces, and the mountain top was closed to tourists. The hotel did not reopen to tourists after the war.

In 2004 it was agreed that the summit buildings would undergo a total refurbishment. Demolition is due to start in the autumn of 2006, with the new centre being ready in 2007. There has been much debate about the form of the new buildings, but one thing is certain – whatever the new buildings look like, they will always be a welcome sight to walkers who have struggled their way to the top of the mountain!

Verona, or Veronia, was a city of the Euganei, who were obliged to cede it to the Cenomani (550 BC).

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With the conquest of the Valley of the Po the Veronese territory became Roman (about 300 BC). Verona became a Roman colonia in 89 BC, and then a municipium in 49 BC; Verona had the franchise in 59.

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Verona is a city and provincial capital in Veneto, Northern Italy.

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The ancient town and the center of the modern city are in a loop of the Adige River near Lake Garda.

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Because of this position, the areas saw regular floodings until 1956, when the Mori-Torbole tunnel was constructed, providing 500 cubic meters of discharge from the Adige river to the Lake Garda in case of flood danger.

In general, Flashbooking guides have been written for giving the essential information about the most visited cities in the world and in particular for any traveller or first-time visitor.

The tunnel reduced the risk of floodings from once every seventy years to once every two centuries.

For a short visit, a week-end, a city break, these free pocket guides are useful printable and downloadable tools available online.

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Sicily has made an indelible mark on the European traveling scene. Is it because of the Volcano that is still burning, or is it because of the rich cultural heritage that the city carries? The European experience has been adorned by the Italian influence. The Greek domination has left such marks on the settlements around Rome and rest of Italy including Greece and Sicily that it has become next to impossible to miss it. The roman leftovers are grand enough to attract the historians as well as the tourists.

Sicily is one of the most sought after destinations in Italy. The tourism advantage that Sicily can give is just an added feature. The reason for this is that it is essentially a culturally charged city. The city has in itself treasured the exploits of the second Great War as well as the ancient historical facts that a significant part of world history. The city holds a distinct aura as differentiable as its language, which is a mixture of many nearby languages. The Mediterranean influence on the place can be felt by the cuisine that is served in its lavishly decorated restaurants.

Sicily holds a unique history that is flanked by the exploits and rule of many dynasties. The geographical location of the place gives a very wrong picture of it being part of the Italian rule. Though it is now a part of Italy but its origin and history is different from that of Italy. The main land of Sicily is separated from the Italian land and thus it finds many indigenous people living in it. How ever it has been a favorite of almost all the empires. The Carthage, the Greeks and the Normans fought over the land too much and it saw the changing the hands. Rome was finally the victor and they ruled it for a long time. Then in the late 19th century Italy took over the control. However the impact of mafia on the island is too much and large part of the land is still under its influence. The city also has the honor of perpetrating the mafia concept.

The Greek and the roman influence on the city can be seen by the architecture that is seen around the city. The enormous size of the cathedrals and platforms dazzles the mind of the visitors. The Sicilian backdrop has been used by many film makers and performers. The sheer grandeur of the roman and Greek constructions makes it one of the most sought after destination in southern Europe.

Mount Etna is one of the volcanoes that is still active apart from being the tallest in Europe. The rich thick forest cover around the Etna region is an added attraction to the tourists. Apart from the seldom traffic problems and delays in flights and trains, the city offers a vista of traveling experiences.

The city is easy to approach, as it is a part of most of eastern and southern European tours. The individual visit can also be a good idea. From romanticism of the mafia to the raw power of nature Sicily has it all.

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