Tips For Spicing Up Seafood Japanese Home Cooking Beyond Sushi They Say Look In The Mirror Don T See Fat See Beautiful That S Not Going To Make You Healthy Or Unclog Your Arteries Or Improve Your Diabetes Cooking A Cholesterol Free Feast European Teapot Teakettle That Settled The West

The allure of exotic spices launched Columbus on his journey of discovery. Today, home chefs can explore new taste sensations by using spices and other flavorful ingredients to add a new world of flavor to fresh fish and seafood.

“There’s nothing like the fresh flavors of herbs and spices for cutting unhealthy calories without sacrificing taste,” said Red Lobster Executive Chef Michael LaDuke, who offers the following simple tips for enhancing the natural flavor of fresh fish and seafood:

World of Flavors: An easy recipe that turns fresh fish into an exotic dish is topping tilapia with a mixture of soy sauce, lime juice, orange juice, fresh ginger, garlic and cilantro.

To produce a richer flavor, make the soy sauce mixture at least 24 hours in advance and refrigerate the sauce overnight. Serve the sauce at room temperature or slightly warmed. With its sweet, mild taste and firm, flaky texture, tilapia will soak up the flavors and take on a deliciously Asian flair.

If you prefer a delicately flavorful fish such as halibut, complement its medium-to-firm texture with bold spice blends such as curry or chili.

Healthy Oils: The key to making flavorful oils for a simply elegant and heart-healthy meal is to add herbs and spices, such as basil, garlic, salt and pepper, to olive oil over a low heat on the stove, similar to making tea. This allows you to adjust the intensity of the flavor. After heating the olive oil, strain the mixture and remove the herbs and spices. For a special touch, place the olive oil on your table surrounded by sprigs of the fresh herbs and spices.

Be adventurous! Add a variety of flavorful herbs and spices to your oil mixture, such as exotic peppers, chives, dill, lemongrass or mint. If you serve olive oil over salmon, you’ll also enjoy the heart-health benefits of essential omega-3 fatty acids found in this delicious fish.

Cooking With Wine: Wine is not only good for drinking, it’s also great for cooking. Pour white wine, such as a Sauvignon Blanc, over a firm white fish like mahi-mahi and season it with chili powder to intensify the flavor. Mahi-mahi is light enough to bring out the crisp citrus taste of this popular wine. But remember, your sauce will be only as good as the wine you choose, so always cook with a wine you enjoy drinking.

Adding Some Zest: Add the tangy flavor of citrus by generously squeezing lemon, lime, orange or grapefruit juices over your favorite fish or seafood and garnishing with freshly grated zest. When using fruit zests as a garnish, it is best to slightly poach them beforehand in sugar water, as raw zests can taste bitter.

For quick, tasty meals, make a citrus butter ahead of time by combining melted butter and citrus juices, cooling the mixture and storing it in the refrigerator until ready to use. Citrus juices mixed with melted butter also make great dipping sauces for succulent lobster and shrimp.

Studies show eating fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, including mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna and salmon, at least twice a week is good for the heart. Using an array of herbs and spices offers endless opportunities to bring out the best in all varieties of fresh fish and seafood.

Red Lobster serves guests fresh fish entrees with bold flavors, savory seafood dishes that include shrimp, crab and scallops, as well as the company’s signature, live Maine lobster.

In general, the Japanese people are very healthy and live longer than any other culture in the world. Why is this? Many people attribute it to the way they eat. But if you think that all Japanese people eat is sushi you couldn’t be more wrong. Japanese home cooking is simple, healthy, and delicious. While some of the ingredients may seem exotic and intimidating, rest assured that anyone can cook wonderful delicious Japanese meals with ease.

Sushi is the most popular type of Japanese food, enjoyed throughout the world. You may notice that sushi is quite filling, and you typically eat much less than you would a more Western style meal, such as a hamburger. What is it about sushi that makes it so filling and satisfying? The answer could be rice.

Rice is definitely a staple of any Japanese meal. Whether it is served as a side dish or along with a saucier entr
Henry Ford said, “Whether you think you can, or you can’t, you are usually right.” If you really want to improve yourself, know that you can. You will not be dieting, you will be changing ingredients and you will give in to some changes without turning your nose up before trying. It took a long time to put that weight on, it will come off, but not in 6 weeks like the skinny models on your TV screen. Have patience! Don’t have the mindset of a dieter. Remember, you are not starving. You are eating delicious, tasty food.

My husband was 241 lbs. and had a triple bypass six years ago. Today he weighs 178 lbs. and his cholesterol is 108. I never lied to him about his food; I just neglected to mention that I did things like replacing the ground beef in his chili with veggie protein crumbles (from the frozen food case) and the shredded cheddar was veggie cheese from the supermarket produce department. Believe it or not the shredded veggie cheddar tastes and melts so much better than the regular no-fat cheddar. He loves it! I finally had to tell him why he was losing so much weight. He was beginning to think there was something terribly wrong with him.

I bought a cook book with lots of creamy comfort foods that he always craved. None had the heavy cream, butter and cheese that comfort food usually has. I learned how to substitute fat-free half & half or evaporated skim milk for cream. I used margarine with no trans-fat and after a while, I didn’t need a special cookbook. It was easy to convert any recipe to low fat, low calorie, low anything.

Here’s a good example of a recipe conversion: Original recipe was made with veal not chicken. I used healthy olive oil and margarine, reduced both to 1
When it comes to lowering one’s cholesterol levels, it is a must that one changes his or her eating lifestyle. Cholesterol buildup in the body is actually caused by eating way too much of the sinful types of food like processed meat, fried food, sugar rich foods and beverages like chocolates (although dark chocolate, the bitter kind is actually proven to help lower one’s cholesterol levels) and soft drinks.

1. Eliminate Catalyst Factors

It is also important to note that people who have bad lifestyle habits are the usual targets of having incredibly high cholesterol levels. Smoking and drinking are the common vices that people, not only those who are suffering from high cholesterol levels, should eliminate once and for all from their systems.

2. Cooking With No Cholesterol In Mind

– When buying cereals or microwavable pre-packed foods like t.v. dinners look at the labels on the side of the box to ensure that you are not going to take in excess calories and fat

– Being aware of what you take in is the first step in lowering high cholesterol

– Avoid restauraunts and fast food places that offer all you can eat meals or incredibly enormous meals

– The serving size listed on the packaging is sometimes misleading – a serving size is not always the total size of the package, it is often one-half or even less

3. Know How To Read Food Labels

Food labels are divided into two parts – the top half deals with aspects of food you should limit, such as total fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates and protein. The bottom is a summary of those you need, such as vitamins, iron, etc.

It is actually quite hard to understand what most food labels mean, in a way they are quite deceiving. You may think that you are eating healthy when in reality you are unknowingly taking in cholesterol, fat and calories in reduced levels. Here are a list of some of the claims that we can often find on our food’s packaging according to the Food and Drugs Authority –

– Calorie-free –

This product has fewer calories per serving (around 5 calories less) than the leading brand. It does not mean the product contains no calories.

– Low-sodium –

This product contains less than 140mg of salt per food serving.

– Low-calorie –

The food is actually less than 40 calories per serving.

– Low-cholesterol –

Less than 20mg of cholesterol as well as only 2 grams of fat per food serving

25 percent less of what health professionals specify for the nutrients as well as the calories of a usual food product of the same type

The European Teapot has become an American heirloom that most of us thought originated here. Craftsmen and glassblowers from Europe have immortalized their craft for the American market where most European Teakettles are sold as gifts.

A teapot makes an attractive gift selection that adds character to a kitchen and is practical for daily purpose. A vast amount of history and culture is attached to the teapot. Its invention dates back to the sixteenth century. The aim behind creating this kitchen staple was to provide a vessel to brew and serve tea.

Tea has been a popular beverage since its discovery in the third century. The tea plant was first cultivated in the fourth century. This plant is actually a tree of evergreen variety and can grow up to a height of about 50 feet. However, for cultivation purposes, it is usually pruned into bushes and allowed to grow up to a height of five feet.

The discovery of tea has debatable origins. Some give credit to the Chinese Emperor named Chen Nung who reigned during the third century. It is said that he once sat under a tree to boil water for drinking. The leaves of the tree Camellia sinensis dropped into his bowl. The resultant mixture was so tasty that it prompted tea making.

Some attribute the discovery of tea to a Dharuma Buddhist monk who went to India from China in the fifth century. It is reported he discovered a brewed drink from the leaves of the tea plant which assisted in keeping him alert and awake.

Tea making, as practiced in ancient times was not as simple as it is today. In the eighth century, tea leaves were rolled manually and then dried. These dried leaves were ground into a powder, mixed with salt and shaped into cakes. To make tea, a cake was dropped into a bowl of boiling water to form a thick fluid. In the later years, the loose powder began being used. The powder was mixed with hot water and a froth was whipped up, steeped, and the mixture was poured.

Teapots were first introduced in China during the Ming Dynasty. They were made of purple clay called “zisha”. Teapots were also known as teakettles and used in Europe only after 1610, when the Dutch importers introduced tea there. In the eighteenth century teapots were made of porcelain and contained artistic paintings on its rounded surfaces. The English added their touch by mixing bone ash with porcelain clay to give it a freshly distinct look. The evolution of the teapot spanned hundreds of years to attain its present form. Today teakettles can be found in large varieties ranging from clay, porcelain, glass to even stoneware.

There are certain factors to be kept in mind while selecting the right

teapot. The European Teapot is the most sought after of all teakettles. Do remember to check the following:

1.. Looks – A thing of beauty is a joy forever. Selecting a European teapot that is visually appealing is the first step. It should look good enough to make a person long to use it. An attractive teakettle becomes a conversation piece and makes you want to show it off to your guests.

2.. Material – The right material is based on the use you want to put it to. A clay or porcelain teapot is a good idea if you only want something to serve tea in. A special glass teapot is ideal if you want to avoid unnecessary hassles as you can brew as well as serve tea in it. It is sturdy enough to be used on the stovetop and at the same time, it makes for pretty tea ware for your guests.

3.. Handle – Ensure that the handle is of a material that does not get heated making it difficult to hold. This should be especially looked into while buying a stovetop teapot. A handle that gets hot on heating will only serve to increase your troubles and the risk of burning your fingers.

4.. Flow – A good teapot is one in which the liquid will flow out smoothly through the spout without any risk of leakage. If the teapot is equipped with an infuser, its even better, as the tea will automatically be strained on pouring.

5.. Tightness – Keep in mind to check that the lid of the teapot is

tightly fitted. This will ensure that tea will remain hot longer and is an essential for brewing good tea (in a glass teapot only).

6.. Gravity center of the teapot – Try this small test. Fill the teapot with water to three-fourths of its capacity. Lift and pour the water into a cup. If you find any difficulty or if the hand becomes unbalanced, the teapot’s gravity center is not right. Reject such an item immediately.

The style of European teapot is an ideal kitchen gift for any virtually any occasion – a birthday, anniversary or Mother’s Day.

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