Yacht Charter In Northern Crete Kayaking Facts Bali Paradise Of Indonesia

Crete was home to one of world’s most important civilisations, the Minoans who ruled the eastern Mediterranean from 2800 – 1150 BC. The art that has survived shows a refined and peace loving culture. There is a good collection in the Museum at Iraklion.

Through commerce, shipping and trade with other peoples, the Egyptians, Phoenicians and Syrians they built a powerful civilisation. The Achaians and the Dorians followed. The Romans occupied Crete 69 – 330 AD making Gortyn their major town. Crete fell into the Arabic hands in 824 and was not liberated until 961). Then in 1204, the island passed to the Venetians. They fortified the island with several new castles and broke the ground for new cities of Hania and Rethimno. Inside the walls the cities developed with narrow alleys and houses, interspersed with decorative churches, fountains, piazzas and palaces the remains of which can still be seen today. In 1645 the Turks set foot on the island for the first time and in 1669 the whole of Crete fell to them. Not until 1913 was the island reunited with the rest of Greece.

In the summer the prevailing wind is the infamous Meltemi from the NW – WNW. July and August sees the winds at their strongest, force 5 – 6 on the northern coast but more often a more gentle force 3 – 4. The spring and autumn sees winds form the south, force 2 – 4. The southern coast is notorious for strong squalls the blow down from the mountains. There is little in the way of warning and they can be violent close inshore. It gets very hot on the island during the summer months with the average daily temperature reaching 35 deg C in July and August and temperatures as high as 40 deg C are not uncommon.

Kissamoss lies in the NW corner of Crete. Yachts can berth alongside or anchor of in the harbour. There is good shelter from the W and NW but it is open to the E and SE. In a strong northerly getting away can be difficult, as the yacht will have to beat for 14 miles to escape the bay. Water is available and the re is a taverna close by. The nearest provisions are at Kastelli, which is a one mile bus journey away.

Khania is to the E. Entrance can be difficult in a strong northerly as the sea heaps up around the entrance. The marina is in the E basin. You will be directed to a berth where a laid mooring awaits. There is good shelter in all but northerly gales. There is water and electricity on the pontoons. A mini tanker can deliver fuel. All provisions can be obtained and there are good tavernas in the town. This Venetian city was for centuries the capital of Crete and much of the charming architecture remains.

Soudhas is further to the E. It is the Greek navy’s southern base and yachts have been refused entry at times. If allowed in go bow or stern to on the S quay. Shelter is extremely good. There is water on the ferry mole and fuel can be delivered. All provisions can be obtained and there is a good choice of tavernas. The military presence tends to put a bit of a dampener on things and this is not a must visit.

Yioryiopolis is a small harbour at the mouth of the river Almiros. Go alongside the quay or anchor in the bay to the north. There is good shelter except with winds from the N – NE. There is water in the village and most provisions can be obtained and there are several tavernas. The village is both attractive the locals are friendly making a visit well worthwhile.

Rethimon is an old Venetian harbour. Go alongside inside the N jetty or bow or stern to the E jetty. There is good shelter even from the Meltemi tucked under the E jetty. There is water on the quay and fuel can be delivered. All provisions can be obtained and there are some good tavernas including several fish restaurants in the Venetian harbour. This should be one of the highlights of the charter. The Venetian harbour and town are attractive and the buildings with wooden balconies are a reminder of Turkish occupation.

Iraklion is the capital of Crete. Proceed to the Venetian harbour at the W end of the main harbour. Go bow or stern to at the “marina” in the S or on the N quay. There is water on the quay and fuel can be delivered. There is excellent shopping and fresh fish is sold in the harbour. There are good tavernas many of which serve fresh fish. Try those around the market in town. The city itself has little to recommend it but visits to Knossus, an archaeological site, go early in the morning or late in the afternoon to avoid the tourists. And the museum containing a collection from the Minoan times is worthwhile.

Khersonisos is a small harbour. Go bow to the mole or anchor off. Care is needed because depths vary throughout the harbour and the holding is poor on sand and rock. There is good shelter from the N as the harbour is open only to the SE. Water, fuel and provisions can all be found in the town. The town is a modern tourist development, full of bad architecture and obnoxious holidaymakers.

Spinalonga Lagoon is situated in the N of the larger bay Kolpos Merembellou. Yachts can anchor anywhere in the lagoon. Most provisions can be obtained at Elounda. Take a look at Nisis Spinalongas. The setting for the Venetian fort and deserted settlement are most attractive.

Further to the south is Ay Nikolaos. There is a marina on the S side of the headland. Yachts should bow or stern to where directed and use a laid mooring. There is water and electric on the pontoons. Fuel can be delivered to the yacht. There are numerous tavernas and most provisions can be obtained. This fishing village is now a large tourist development although the marina is sited some way from the noisy area.

Pahia Ammos is situated at the S end of Kolpos Merembellou. There are depths of up to 3m at the extremity of the mole. The harbour is exposed to the Meltemi. Limited provisions can be obtained in the village and there are several tavernas

Further W lies Sitia. Go bow or stern to the inner N mole. The bottom is sand and weed with some rocks. There is good shelter from the Meltemi. There are both fuel and water in the harbour. All provisions can be obtained in the town and there are several good fish restaurants. The inner harbour with its tree lined esplanade is pleasant and watching dusk fall over the harbour while tucking in to a nice sea bass is the perfect end to a day’s charter.

Ak Sidhero is the NE tip of Crete and to the S there are several anchorages in small inlets. There are no facilities but the scenery is imposing with a desolate feel.

Crete’s cuisine is similar to that found throughout the Aegean. Fish plays a large part in the form of tuna, swordfish, sea bass, urchins, octopus, squid and cuttlefish. You will find beef, pork, lamb and goat. A rabbit stew is a speciality. As is cheese pie and fried cheese (staka). For those with a sweet tooth try yogurt and honey tarts (kaltzounia). Cretan wine is fairly good.

Kayaking is the process by which a kayak will be used to move through rivers or lakes. The kayak is a small boat that must be powered by a human. It will have a deck which is covered, and it will also feature a cockpit that is covered as well. A special paddle is used to push it forward, and this boat was first invented by the Inuit and Aleut hunters in the colder regions of North America. A contemporary kayak can come in a wide variety of different styles, and kayaking is a sport which is enjoyed by many people. Research has indicated that the kayak has existed for at least 4,000 years.

Some kayaks can hold a maximum of three people, but they will commonly only seat one or two people. The person will sit in the cockpit facing forward, and the spray skirt will stop water from getting into the craft. While the Aleut or Inuit males would design kayaks to be used for hunting, some kayaks were specifically designed for women. Generally, a kayak will be about 17 fee long, and could be 22 inches wide and 7 inches deep. In the early models, the kayak could almost be compared to an additional layer of clothing. Kayaks are commonly used today by people who practice kayaking.

Kayaking is the process of paddling a kayak on water that is moving. While some people consider it to be a sport, others do it for mere recreation. There are multiple forms of kayaking, and the two most common are Sea kayaking and Whitewater kayaking. While traditional kayaks were made from wood and animal skins, most kayaks today are made from materials such as kevlar or fiberglass. Some people will challenge fast moving rivers by using a kayak to move through certain sections of a river. These trips may last a single day, or could last multiple days. Whitewater Racing is a professional competition in which racers will attempt to use kayaks to outrace each other.

The term creeking is used to describe kayaking in difficult rivers. People who practice creeking can expect to run into slides, waterfalls, and ledges. Slalom is another form of kayaking in which racers will try to get to the bottom of the specific part of a river. Not only must they move quickly, they must also move around gates, and these are poles that have been set up at certain points in the river. Most Slalom races will have over 20 gates on a single course, and they must be properly navigated. Playboating is another variation which places an emphasis on the artistic side of kayaking instead of the speed.

With this style, the participants will generally remain in one portion of the river, and will seek to move from one point to another. However, they will need to work against the power of the river in order to achieve this. Kayaking is a sport that is popular in places that have strong river. However, it can be dangerous, and some participants have died in the most difficult rivers.

Bali – Paradise of Indonesia

“Glorious Bali Island” – that’s the official motto of this paradise island, well known to the entire world since World War II. Bali is the most famous tourist destination of Indonesia and preferred location for sun lovers from the west, so undoubtedly the next choice of www.travelonguide.com had to be Bali.

Beach lovers can have a wonderful time in Bali, since day time they could enjoy the sun and at night enjoy the dances and cultural shows on the beach. On a full moon day the Balinese people organize special beach games…. and guess what even a funeral is a procession and an event where people enjoy themselves. Opt for a candle light beach dinner and we guarantee you that the experience will be something that you will cherish throughout your life, the Balinese dancers and singers will add icing to this special moment.

If you are planning your trip to Bali, then its best to have some information about its climatic conditions. Since Bali has a tropical climate, the temperature throughout the year is not more than 26 degrees Celsius. The dry season starts from April till September and the wet season from October till March, and the best time to be there is from May to August, when the sun shines bright and the uninvited drizzle keeps the climate cool.

Water sport lovers, just should miss this place. Bali offers world class scuba diving experience, there are special schools where one could learn scuba diving. The coral reefs are purely untouched and display a wide range of sea life, never seen before even on Discovery Channel. If you like to see the corals, then make sure that you take a trip to Nusa Penida. This beach also offers various other water sports options. For people who are more adventurous, can go rafting in the Ayung river or try some mountain cycling. Walking in rice paddies is also a wonderful experience.

Bali is one of very few places of Indonesia dominated by the Hindus, who celebrate all Hindu festivals and have retained all Hindu traditions. Coming to the food options, Bali offers all cuisine right from Indian, Chinese, Malaysian, Moroccan and even Mexican. One should not forget to try the sumptuous Grilled Lobsters specially served with a typical Balinese sauce.

For those who are not so adventurous type and like being spoilt and pampered, then Bali is where you should head to. Apart from the beautiful resorts like any other beach destination, you will also find beach villas. These villas are well equipped, some with private pool, trained cooks, maids and house boys, who just don’t leave any effort to pamper you. Hiring a private villa could be a much cheaper and cozier experience for those who are on a honeymoon and need some intimacy. Just like Mauritius and Maldives, getting married in Bali is also possible.

We hope that we have truly tried to inspire our readers to pack their bags and head to Bali, and if you indeed enjoyed reading about Bali, then make sure to log on to www.travelonguide.com for more exotic locations.

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